Kryptos, an artwork at MONA, by Brigita Ozolins

Concrete, concrete render, steel, aluminium, gold, lead, mirror, LED lighting, cuneiform artefacts, soundtracks x 3. Viewed in May 2012.

Brigita Ozolins brings MONA’s eponymous “old” and “new” together in Kryptos, an enchanting, multi-faceted and surprising installation commissioned by David Walsh. The work sits on the second of the three basement floors that make up the museum, and its plain unmarked doorway is easily missed by those who are hurrying towards the more infamous pieces covering sex, death and shit, such as the artificial digestive system of Wim Delvoye’s Cloaca Professional.

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Cat on a Hot Tin Roof (Belvoir St Theatre 2013)

Belvoir St Theatre, Sydney, 31st March 2013

Director Simon Stone follows up on last year’s controversial adaptation of Death of a Salesman with this energetic production of the Tennesee WIlliams classic Cat on a Hot Tin Roof.

This production stars Ewen Leslie (Dead Europe) as Brick and Jacqueline McKenzie (Sex With Strangers) as Maggie, the troubled couple at the heart of the play. Big Daddy, Brick’s father, is played by Marshall Napier, a last-minute substitute for Anthony Phelan.

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Favourite Albums and Gigs of 2012

That time of year has come, and the “best of 2012” lists are proliferating. Overall I’m listening to less music than ever, due to a podcast addiction, but I still think 2012 has been a good year for album releases. Here is my top ten. Make that eleven.

Top 11 Albums

  1. The Laurels – Plains
  2. Tame Impala – Lonerism
  3. The Dirty Three – Whatever You Love You Are
  4. Cat Power – Sun (see my review)
  5. Mosman Alder – Burn Bright
  6. Fabulous Diamonds – Commercial Music (see my review)
  7. Holy Balm – It’s You
  8. Tenniscoats – All Aboard (see my (review)
  9. Dinosaur Jr – I Bet On Sky
  10. Catcall – The Warmest Place
  11. Ned Collette + Wirewalker – 2

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A Book Lover’s Review of Wuthering Heights (2011 Film Adaptation)

The 2011 film adaptation of Emily Brontë’s Wuthering Heights, starring Kaya Scodelario as Catherine and both Solomon Glave and James Howson as Heathcliff, has finally made it to Australian cinemas. In some respects, this is a difficult novel to adapt to screen, and certainly it only succeeds by dropping the overtly literary device of the framing multi-layered narration of Nelly and Lockwood, the latter not even appearing as a character in the film.

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