Shanghai Wedding published in Griffith Review 62: All Being Equal

My novella Shanghai Wedding was a winner in the 2018 The Novella Project VI from Griffith Review and has been published in Griffith Review 62: All Being Equal.

Shanghai Wedding is the story of Billy, a Brisbane-born twenty-something who falls for Qiang, an international student who eventually returns to Shanghai to marry a woman. The idea started with a short story I wrote for hello mr. magazine, ‘Purple Galaxy‘, which focused on a scene of domestic violence in a gay relationship and its aftermath. Not longer after this, I read the ’China’ chapter of Benjamin Law’s book Gaysia, and the characters of Billy and Qiang soon emerged. Shanghai Wedding is a story spanning two very different river cities—Brisbane and Shanghai—and the complications that can arise in cross-cultural relationships. The story opens with Billy arriving in Shanghai, but shifts back to tell their back story before finally ending, of course, in Shanghai.

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Hopping Kings of the Dark Morning: short fiction / novel extract published by Peril Magazine

This piece is from Chapter Ten of my novel (novella?) manuscript, but I adapted in a way that I hope works well on its own. It seemed like a good fit for Peril Magazine’s “We’re Queer Here” series and thankfully they agreed!

Head over to Peril Magazine to check it out and browse the rest of the series while you’re there.

 

Fudgepackers: new short fiction published at Verity La

Another piece in my favourite online journal, Verity La. This one is part of their “Out of Limbo” series, which aims to capture coming out stories by queer writers. This story is about coming out as a never-ending pursuit: “coming out to people in various subtle ways, again and again, until it all just becomes too tiring”. It’s also a story about male friendship and how things can go unspoken until it’s too late.

‘Fudgepackers!’ said John, referring to our American corporate overseers. The spaceship-like Polycom phone had only just made a final crackle before falling silent, so my reaction to his remark was delayed by an anxious feeling that the Americans might have heard him. It was just the two of us in the tiny glass-walled fishbowl meeting room. I gathered my papers and made to leave.

Although I found the word funny, I shot him what I hoped was a hurt glance and said, ‘That’s such an offensive word. I’d prefer you didn’t use it.’

John gave a knowing look and nodded.

‘Sorry. No offence intended.’

Does that count as coming out? I walked out of the room and we never spoke of it again.

Head over to Verity La to read the rest of the story.

The Rattler: flash fiction published on Verity La

Let’s rattle this ghost town! A flash fiction piece in which I compare the Brisbane River to “slug guts”. I’m thrilled to have it featured in Verity La.

“Billy passed back the joint, his mouth hot and dry, his brain expanding but feeling too many things at once, wanting more and more and more, but with a queasy sense that this might not go well at all, except—you never know—maybe it would.”

Go read it and subscribe to their email newsletter for a regular fix of new writing.

What He Left Behind: short fiction published in antiTHESIS journal

ANTITHESIS is a refereed arts and humanities journal edited by graduate students and published annually in association with the School of Culture and Communication at the University of Melbourne. As a postgrad student of creative writing, I’m delighted to have my story “What He Left Behind” included in Volume 25.

coverThe story is inspired by the Chinese dating show, If You Are The One and Brigita Ozolin’s artwork Kryptos, which is built into Tasmania’s MONA museum. (For more information about Kryptos, you can read my review here).

Here is the first paragraph of the story:

When he appeared on If You Are The One, some of the girls said he was too cute. Effeminate. Pew! Pew! Pew! went their buzzers as they decided not to chance a date with him. Their comments were surprising: he used to fuck you, hard—it was never the other way around—and dominance seemed to be his only mode, both in and out of bed. He was slim, yes, but not short, and he stood before the girls with a confident smile, wearing jeans and a tight-fitting dress shirt. Maybe the shirt sent a certain signal, or maybe the girls—having only his physical characteristics and initial mannerisms to remark on so early in the show—sensed his subterfuge and called him out on it. Either way, he was cute, that much is true. You remember.

Grab a copy of ANTITHESIS to read more!